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Articles About Acromegaly

Several short articles on acromegaly are provided on this Web page. Acromegaly is a hormonal disorder that results when the pituitary gland produces too much growth hormone. This can result in symptoms such as abnormal growth of the hands and feet. For additional articles on acromegaly, please visit eMedTV's acromegaly health channel.

 

What Is Acromegaly?

Acromegaly is a hormonal disorder that results when the pituitary gland produces excess growth hormone (GH). It most commonly affects middle-aged adults, and can result in serious illness and premature death. Once recognized, the condition is treatable in most patients, but because of its slow and often insidious onset, acromegaly frequently is not diagnosed correctly.
 
(Click Acromegaly for the complete full-length article on this condition.)
 

What Causes Acromegaly?

Acromegaly is caused by prolonged overproduction of growth hormone by the pituitary gland. This can be caused by:
 
(Click Acromegaly Causes to learn more about what causes this disease.)
 

Symptoms of Acromegaly

One of the most common symptoms of this condition is the abnormal growth of the hands and feet. Soft tissue swelling of the hands and feet is often an early symptom, with people noticing a change in ring or shoe size.
 
(Click Acromegaly Symptoms for more detailed information about the possible signs of this condition.)
 

Treating Acromegaly

Current options for treating acromegaly include:
 
  • Surgical removal of the tumor
  • Drug therapy
  • Radiation therapy of the pituitary.
     
(Click Acromegaly Treatment for more information.)
 

Articles About Acromegaly

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