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Precautions and Warnings With Pioglitazone and Glimepiride - Saxagliptin/Metformin ER Drug Information

This page contains links to eMedTV Endocrine System Articles containing information on subjects from Precautions and Warnings With Pioglitazone and Glimepiride to Saxagliptin/Metformin ER Drug Information. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Precautions and Warnings With Pioglitazone and Glimepiride
    This eMedTV page lists precautions and warnings with pioglitazone and glimepiride to be aware of before taking it. The list includes possible side effects, such as low blood sugar and weight gain, and people who should not take the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Pioglitazone and Metformin
    This eMedTV resource provides precautions and warnings with pioglitazone and metformin to be aware of, including who should not take the drug and possible side effects. For example, people with kidney disease should not take the medication.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Pramlintide
    Some precautions and warnings with pramlintide concern allergic reactions that the drug may cause. This eMedTV segment discusses warnings and precautions to be aware of with pramlintide, such as those involving low blood sugar.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Regular Insulin
    Talk to your doctor before taking regular insulin if you have liver or kidney disease. This eMedTV page offers other precautions and warnings with regular insulin, and lists other conditions you should tell your doctor about before starting the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Repaglinide
    This eMedTV segment describes several precautions and warnings with repaglinide, such as the potential for allergic reactions, possible side effects, and the danger of taking the drug when pregnant. This page also lists those who should not take it.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Repaglinide and Metformin
    This eMedTV page covers several precautions and warnings with repaglinide and metformin, such as potential allergic reactions, possible life-threatening complications, and other safety concerns. This page also lists those who should not take the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Rosiglitazone
    This portion of the eMedTV archives examines several precautions and warnings with rosiglitazone, including potential drug interactions, possible weight gain, and the danger of increased liver enzymes. This page also lists who should avoid the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Rosiglitazone and Glimepiride
    This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at several precautions and warnings with rosiglitazone and glimepiride, including the danger of taking the drug while pregnant and possible allergic reactions. This page also covers who should avoid the drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Rosiglitazone and Metformin
    A rare but possible side effect of rosiglitazone and metformin is low blood sugar. This eMedTV page contains more precautions and warnings with rosiglitazone and metformin, and offers a list of certain people who should not take the diabetes drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Saxagliptin
    People with kidney problems need to take lower doses of saxagliptin. This eMedTV resource lists other warnings and precautions for saxagliptin, including information on what you should discuss with your doctor before starting this particular drug.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Saxagliptin/Metformin ER
    People who have pernicious anemia or metabolic acidosis may not be able to take saxagliptin/metformin ER. This eMedTV article provides detailed warnings and precautions for this drug, including issues to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Sitagliptin and Metformin Extended-Release
    Not everyone can safely use sitagliptin and metformin extended-release, as explained in this eMedTV Web page. Important precautions and warnings are included in this article, including problems that may occur and who should avoid this medicine.
  • Precautions and Warnings With Testosterone Topical Solution
    This eMedTV page lists several warnings and precautions for testosterone topical solution, including why it's important for women and children not to come into contact with it. This article also explains what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Pregnancy and Other Medical Conditions
    How will pregnancy affect your other medical conditions? This eMedTV page explains that, although the results may be unpredictable, you can reduce your risk of problems by consulting your healthcare provider. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Primary Adrenal Insufficiency
    Primary adrenal insufficiency can occur when the adrenal glands stop making certain hormones. This eMedTV article offers a detailed description of this condition, including information on its symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.
  • Prolactinoma
    A prolactinoma is a common noncancerous tumor affecting the pituitary gland. This eMedTV article discusses this medical condition in detail, including information about symptoms they may cause and treatment options for the tumors.
  • Prolactinoma and Birth Control Pills
    To date, no research has suggested a link between prolactinoma and birth control pills. This eMedTV article discusses how, in fact, estrogen replacement therapy is a safe treatment method for post-menopausal women with prolactinomas.
  • Prolactinoma and Pregnancy
    Careful monitoring (including MRIs) is vital for any woman dealing with both a prolactinoma and pregnancy. This eMedTV article discusses the risks involved with a prolactinoma during pregnancy and suggests ways to reduce them.
  • Prolactinoma Information
    Prolactinomas can cause infertility, menstrual changes, and other symptoms. This eMedTV segment offers more information on prolactinomas, such as how they are treated and where they occur. A link to more details is also included.
  • Prolactinoma Symptoms
    This part of the eMedTV site looks at possible signs and symptoms of a prolactinoma, such as low libido, infertility, and menstrual changes. This article also explains how men and women will often have different symptoms.
  • Prolactinoma Treatment
    In most cases, prolactinoma treatment begins with medications such as bromocriptine or cabergoline. As this eMedTV article explains, other options include surgery and radiation therapy. This page describes the different treatment options in detail.
  • Propylthiouracil
    Doctors may recommend propylthiouracil to treat hyperthyroidism when another drug isn't working. This eMedTV page discusses this prescription medication in detail, with information on who it is used for, when and how to take it, side effects, and more.
  • Propylthiouracil and Breastfeeding
    This article from the eMedTV site explains why, in some cases, breastfeeding women can take propylthiouracil (PTU), although the infant should be monitored for problems. This page also describes an alternative medicine that could be considered instead.
  • Propylthiouracil and Pregnancy
    A pregnant woman may take propylthiouracil (PTU) under certain circumstances. This eMedTV page describes these special situations, explains the risks the drug presents, and warns against the dangers of not treating an overactive thyroid during pregnancy.
  • Propylthiouracil Dosage
    This page from the eMedTV archives lists the factors that will affect the propylthiouracil dosage a person is prescribed -- age is just one of them. Helpful tips that can ensure a safe, effective treatment process are also provided.
  • Propylthiouracil Drug Information
    People with an overactive thyroid may be prescribed propylthiouracil. This eMedTV segment provides important information on this drug, including who it is generally prescribed to, dosing information, and what to tell your healthcare provider.
  • Propylthiouracil Drug Interactions
    You may be monitored more carefully while taking propylthiouracil if drug interactions are a concern. This eMedTV article lists the medications that could react with propylthiouracil and describes the problems that could occur as a result.
  • Propylthiouracil Medication Information
    If you are looking for information on propylthiouracil, this eMedTV article is a great place to start. It discusses what the medication is used for, how to take it, and more. Also included in this article is a link to more information.
  • Propylthiouracil Overdose
    People who take too much propylthiouracil (PTU) may be given activated charcoal if the overdose was recent. This eMedTV segment lists the effects that can occur with an overdose of this drug and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Propylthiouracil Side Effects
    Because propylthiouracil is an older medication, specific information on side effects is not available. This eMedTV resource lists the possible propylthiouracil side effects a person may experience, including ones that require prompt medical attention.
  • Propylthiouracil Uses
    The FDA has approved propylthiouracil to treat an overactive thyroid. However, as this eMedTV page explains, its use is limited. This segment explains when propylthiouracil is used, how it works, and briefly describes symptoms of hyperthyroidism.
  • Propylthiouracil Warnings and Precautions
    You should avoid alcohol while taking propylthiouracil. Precautions and warnings, which this eMedTV page provides, also apply to people with liver disease, bleeding disorders, and allergies. You should also have regular blood tests during treatment.
  • Regular Insulin
    Regular insulin is a short-acting insulin medication used to treat diabetes. This eMedTV resource describes how this form of insulin works, explains when and how to inject the medicine, and lists some of the potential side effects of this product.
  • Regular Insulin Dosage
    No standard regular insulin dosage will work for all people (or the same person in all situations). This eMedTV segment explains what you can do to help your doctor determine an appropriate regular insulin dose and where to inject the medication.
  • Regular Insulin Information
    Regular insulin is a drug used to treat diabetes. This part of the eMedTV library gives an overview of regular insulin, with information on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Repaglinide
    Repaglinide is a prescription drug that is licensed to lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug works to increase insulin production, lists potential side effects, and offers tips on taking it.
  • Repaglinide and Metformin
    Repaglinide and metformin is a prescription drug used to lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how the medication works, outlines potential side effects, and offers tips on when and how to take it.
  • Repaglinide and Metformin Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended starting repaglinide and metformin dosage will vary based on several factors. This article describes the factors that may affect your dosage and provides some general dosing guidelines for this medication.
  • Repaglinide Dosing
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended starting repaglinide dose is generally 0.5 mg, taken before each meal. However, the repaglinide dosing amount may be higher based on certain blood tests. This page also offers tips on taking the medicine.
  • Repaglinide Drug Information
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may recommend taking repaglinide. This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of repaglinide, including information on some of the drug's side effects.
  • Repaglinide-Metformin Information
    Available in the form of a tablet, repaglinide and metformin is a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV segment offers a quick overview of repaglinide and metformin, including information on how it works.
  • Rosiglitazone
    Rosiglitazone is a prescription medicine that lowers blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how rosiglitazone works, covers potential side effects, and offers some tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Rosiglitazone and Glimepiride
    Rosiglitazone and glimepiride is a prescription medication that is approved to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explains how rosiglitazone and glimepiride works to lower blood sugar levels and lists some potential side effects of the drug.
  • Rosiglitazone and Glimepiride Dosage
    This eMedTV Web page explains that the usual starting rosiglitazone and glimepiride dosage is 4 mg/1 mg once a day. This page also describes some tips on when and how to take the medication and explains how your dosage will be determined.
  • Rosiglitazone and Glimepiride Drug Info
    This eMedTV article contains information on rosiglitazone and glimepiride, a combination drug used to treat diabetes. This resource explores side effects, dosing guidelines, and more. Also included is a link to more in-depth information.
  • Rosiglitazone and Metformin
    Rosiglitazone and metformin is a medicine that can be prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. This eMedTV Web page explains how rosiglitazone and metformin works and offers general dosing information and precautions for the drug.
  • Rosiglitazone and Metformin Dosage
    Most people start with a rosiglitazone and metformin dosage of 2 mg/500 mg once or twice daily. This eMedTV page also offers dosing recommendations for those who are switching to the combination drug from just metformin or just rosiglitazone.
  • Rosiglitazone and Metformin Info
    A combination medication, rosiglitazone and metformin is prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV selection offers more information on rosiglitazone and metformin, including dosing guidelines on how often to use it.
  • Rosiglitazone Dosing
    This eMedTV article explains that the recommended starting rosiglitazone dosage is 4 mg once daily (or 2 mg twice daily). This Web page outlines some rosiglitazone dosing guidelines and gives some tips on when and how to take the drug.
  • Rosiglitazone Maleate
    Your healthcare provider may prescribe rosiglitazone maleate if you have type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV selection gives an overview of this prescription drug and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Saxagliptin
    The prescription drug saxagliptin is licensed to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. This article from the eMedTV site explains how this oral diabetes medicine works, describes its benefits, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Saxagliptin Dosage
    Many people taking saxagliptin for type 2 diabetes take up to 5 mg once daily. As this eMedTV Web page explains, however, some people may need a lower dose (such as those with severe kidney disease or who are taking certain other drugs).
  • Saxagliptin Drug Information
    This eMedTV article contains information on saxagliptin, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. This resource explores side effects, dosing guidelines, and more. Also included is a link to more details.
  • Saxagliptin/Metformin ER
    The FDA has approved saxagliptin/metformin ER for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed look at this relatively new medication, with information on how it works, side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Saxagliptin/Metformin ER Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that your saxagliptin/metformin ER dosage will be based on how well your diabetes is currently controlled, among other things. The typical starting dose is listed, as are tips to ensure a safe, effective treatment with this drug.
  • Saxagliptin/Metformin ER Drug Information
    This selection from the eMedTV archives provides some important information on saxagliptin/metformin ER, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. It explains what to discuss with the doctor prescribing it and includes a link to a detailed overview.
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