Endocrine System Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Endocrine System Articles A-Z

Drug Interactions With Rosiglitazone and Metformin - Glipizide and Metformin

This page contains links to eMedTV Endocrine System Articles containing information on subjects from Drug Interactions With Rosiglitazone and Metformin to Glipizide and Metformin. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Drug Interactions With Rosiglitazone and Metformin
    Estrogens, diuretics, and Norvasc may cause drug interactions with rosiglitazone and metformin. This eMedTV resource explains what may happen during these interactions and lists other medicines that can lead to an interaction with this drug.
  • Drug Interactions With Saxagliptin
    Certain antibiotics, protease inhibitors, and antifungal medicines may cause saxagliptin drug interactions. This eMedTV article describes the potential effects of these interactions and explains what other medications may interfere with saxagliptin.
  • Drug Interactions With Saxagliptin/Metformin ER
    This selection from the eMedTV archives provides a detailed list of the products that can cause saxagliptin/metformin ER drug interactions, such as thyroid medications. It also explains the problems that can occur as a result and how they can be avoided.
  • Drug Interactions With Sitagliptin
    Drug interactions with sitagliptin are primarily limited to digoxin at this time. As this eMedTV Web page explains, when these two medications are combined, it can increase the level of digoxin in your blood.
  • Drug Interactions With Sitagliptin and Metformin Extended-Release
    As this eMedTV resource explains, interactions with sitagliptin and metformin extended-release and other drugs, such as insulin and corticosteroids, are possible. This page covers the problems that can occur and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Testosterone Topical Solution
    This eMedTV Web article lists several drugs that can interact with testosterone topical solution, including cyclosporine, dexamethasone, and insulin. This article also explains what problems can occur as a result and how to avoid them.
  • Empty Sella Syndrome
    Empty sella syndrome is a condition in which the pituitary gland becomes flattened or shrinks. As this eMedTV article explains, this change in the pituitary gland makes the area of the brain that protects it (the sella turcica) appear empty.
  • Exenatide
    Exenatide is a prescription drug that is licensed to lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page explains how exenatide works to increase insulin production, lists potential side effects, and covers general dosing guidelines.
  • Exenatide Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended starting exenatide dosage is usually 5 mcg injected twice daily. If necessary, the dose may be increased after one month to 10 mcg twice daily. This page also outlines some tips on taking the injections.
  • Exenatide Drug Information
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may prescribe a drug called exenatide. This eMedTV selection offers more information on exenatide, with details on how the drug works and how to use it properly.
  • Exenatide Uses
    This eMedTV resource discusses how exenatide treats type 2 diabetes by increasing the production of insulin and decreasing the production of sugar. This page also explains that there are no universally accepted off-label exenatide uses.
  • Exenitide
    This eMedTV segment explains that exenatide can be prescribed as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Exenatide works by lowering blood sugar levels. This page also outlines some alternatives to exenatide. Exenitide is a common misspelling of exenatide.
  • Extended-Release Exenatide
    The prescription drug extended-release exenatide is licensed to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page presents an overview of this drug, including how this injectable diabetes medicine works, when and how it is given, and potential side effects.
  • Extended-Release Exenatide Dosage
    Anyone using extended-release exenatide will inject the same amount -- 2 mg once a week. This eMedTV Web selection explains how to prepare this injection and also offers some helpful tips on when and how to administer this product.
  • Extended-Release Exenatide Information
    Adults with type 2 diabetes may receive extended-release exenatide to control blood sugar levels. This eMedTV page offers more information on extended-release exenatide, including how it is given and safety issues. A link to more details is also included.
  • Extended-Release Exenatide Side Effects
    Commonly reported side effects of extended-release exenatide include nausea, headaches, and indigestion. This eMedTV segment lists other common reactions to the drug and also describes potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Food to Avoid With Hyperthyroidism
    As this eMedTV article explains, people with hyperthyroidism don't need to avoid certain foods; however, it is still important to follow a balanced diet. This segment explains the ideal diet for those with an overactive thyroid.
  • Foods to Avoid With Hypothyroidism
    People with hypothyroidism don't need to avoid certain foods; however, as this eMedTV page explains, they do need to be aware that some foods can affect how the body absorbs medications used to treat the condition. A link to that list is included.
  • Generic Acarbose
    Acarbose is currently available in generic form. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers an in-depth look at generic acarbose, including information on available strengths, how the FDA classifies the drug, and more.
  • Generic Actoplus Met XR
    At this time, generic Actoplus Met XR is not available, even though the first patent on record has expired. This eMedTV article discusses when a generic version may become available and explains what to do if your insurance doesn't cover Actoplus Met XR.
  • Generic Armour Thyroid
    Some generic drugs have the same components as Armour Thyroid (thyroid USP), but, as this eMedTV article explains, it's difficult to know if these products are equivalent to Armour Thyroid. They may not truly be considered a generic version of the drug.
  • Generic Cytomel
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Cytomel's patents have expired, and generic versions of the drug are available. This article explains what "compounded" Cytomel is and offers a brief overview of what the medication is used for.
  • Generic Glimepiride
    There is currently a generic glimepiride available for sale in six different strengths. This portion of the eMedTV library highlights the different dosages available and lists the companies that currently manufacture generic glimepiride.
  • Generic Glucophage
    Generic Glucophage (metformin) is available in many different strengths and also in a long-acting version. This eMedTV article outlines the various strengths of generic Glucophage and also discusses who makes the drug.
  • Generic Glucotrol
    A generic Glucotrol and Glucotrol XL are currently available for sale. This page of the eMedTV archives explains how the FDA rates generic versions of brand-name drugs and what this means with regards to Glucotrol (which has an "AB" rating).
  • Generic Glyburide and Metformin
    As explained in this eMedTV article, generic versions of glyburide and metformin are currently available. This article takes a closer look at these generic medications and explains how the FDA classifies them.
  • Generic Humalog Mix75/25
    There are currently no generic insulin products available in the United States. This segment of the eMedTV library explains why there are no generic insulin drugs and explores whether generic Humalog Mix75/25 will be available in the future.
  • Generic Inhaled Insulin
    This eMedTV article explains that a patent currently prevents any generic inhaled insulin from being manufactured until 2010, when the patent expires. This page also warns against places claiming to sell a generic version of the medication.
  • Generic Janumet
    At this point, Janumet is not available in generic form. As this section of the eMedTV library explains, generic Janumet is expected to become available in February 2019 (at the earliest), when the first patent for the diabetes medication expires.
  • Generic Korlym
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, Korlym (mifepristone) is protected by exclusivity rights that prevent any company from making a generic version of this drug. This article explains when a generic Korlym might be made and what might delay this.
  • Generic Levothyroxine
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the FDA has recently determined which generic levothyroxine products are equivalent to the brand-name medications. This page also discusses the past problems with generic levothyroxine products.
  • Generic Nateglinide
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic nateglinide is now available. This resource offers information on who makes the generic versions, what strengths they come in, and how they compare to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Novolin N
    There are currently no generic Novolin N (NPH insulin) products available. As this eMedTV page explains, generic biologic drugs (such as generic Novolin N) are not allowed to be manufactured in the U.S., although these laws may change in the future.
  • Generic NovoLog Mix 70/30
    NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine/insulin aspart) does not come in generic form. This eMedTV Web page explores the two obstacles that are currently preventing generic NovoLog Mix 70/30 from becoming available in the U.S.
  • Generic Pioglitazone
    There are now generic versions of pioglitazone (Actos) available. This portion of the eMedTV archives lists the various strengths of these medications and explains why the FDA assigned them an "AB" rating.
  • Generic Pramlintide
    There is no approved generic pramlintide available in the United States. As this eMedTV page explains, the earliest a generic form of the drug could be available is in September 2015. This article also warns of the dangers of fake generic pramlintide.
  • Generic Rosiglitazone
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the first patent for rosiglitazone has already expired, but no generic versions are available. This page takes a look at the possible reasons behind this and explains when the next patent is set to expire.
  • Generic Rosiglitazone and Glimepiride
    No generic versions of rosiglitazone and glimepiride (Avandaryl) are available at this time. This eMedTV article talks about why this is the case and explains when a generic version could become available.
  • Generic Synthroid
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic Synthroid is sold under a variety of different names and in 12 different strengths. This Web page explains how the FDA has determined that certain generic versions are equivalent to the brand-name medication.
  • Generic Tirosint
    A patent currently prevents any generic Tirosint (levothyroxine) from being made. This eMedTV Web resource explains when a generic version may become available and discusses why other generic levothyroxine products are not equivalent to Tirosint.
  • Generic Westhroid
    Since Westhroid (thyroid USP) is not FDA-approved, there are no official generic Westhroid products. As this eMedTV page explains, many generic drugs have the same ingredients as Westhroid, but it is hard to tell if they are actually equivalent.
  • Glimeperide
    This portion of the eMedTV library describes how glimepiride can lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This segment also explains some symptoms of a glimepiride overdose. Glimeperide is a common misspelling of glimepiride.
  • Glimepiride
    Glimepiride is a prescription medicine used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how glimepiride works by increasing insulin production and also highlights dosing guidelines and potential side effects.
  • Glimepiride and Depression
    This eMedTV article explores glimepiride and depression, explaining that depression does not appear to be a common or rare side effect of glimepiride. This page also explains what to do if you notice any symptoms of depression while taking the drug.
  • Glimepiride Dosing
    Generally, people with type 2 diabetes may be given a starting dose of 1 mg or 2 mg of glimepiride. This eMedTV page covers some glimepiride dosing guidelines and tips on when and how to take the drug. The dose can be slowly increased if necessary.
  • Glimepiride Drug Info
    This eMedTV segment features information on glimepiride, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. An explanation of how it works is included, as are safety warnings to consider before starting treatment. A link to more details is also included.
  • Glimiperide
    This eMedTV article explains that glimepiride helps to treat type 2 diabetes by lowering blood sugar levels. This page also lists possible side effects and explains what will determine your dosage. Glimiperide is a common misspelling of glimepiride.
  • Glipizide and Metformin
    Glipizide and metformin is a prescription medicine that lowers blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explains how the medication works to control blood sugar, lists possible side effects, and offers dosing information.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.