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Cushing's Syndrome Prognosis - Drug Interactions With Rosiglitazone and Glimepiride

This page contains links to eMedTV Endocrine System Articles containing information on subjects from Cushing's Syndrome Prognosis to Drug Interactions With Rosiglitazone and Glimepiride. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Cushing's Syndrome Prognosis
    A Cushing's syndrome prognosis depends on what caused the hormonal disorder. As this eMedTV Web page explains, most cases of Cushing's syndrome can be cured; however, some people's recovery can be complicated by the illness that caused the disorder.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Research
    Cushing's syndrome research is being conducted to learn how to better diagnose the condition. This eMedTV segment explores some research now under way on Cushing's syndrome and discusses the possible benefits of participating in such research.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Symptoms
    For people with Cushing's syndrome, symptoms may include extreme weight gain and high blood pressure. This eMedTV article discusses more signs and symptoms of the condition and explains which ones are more common in adults.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Testing
    This eMedTV article covers tests used to diagnose Cushing's syndrome and identify its cause, such as the 24-hour urinary free cortisol level test. Doctors use testing to determine if excess levels of cortisol are present and why.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Treatment
    For people with Cushing's syndrome, treatment options may include surgery, radiotherapy, and drugs. This eMedTV article explains how the cause of excess cortisol production responsible for the disorder affects how Cushing's syndrome is treated.
  • Cushings Desease
    In a person with Cushing's disease, a pituitary tumor produces an excess of cortisol. This eMedTV Web page briefly defines this disease and explains how it can be diagnosed and treated. Cushings desease is a common misspelling of Cushing's disease.
  • Cytomel
    Cytomel is a medication used as a thyroid replacement for people with an underactive thyroid. This eMedTV Web page explains how Cytomel works and offers a more in-depth look at the drug's effects, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Cytomel and Breastfeeding
    Cytomel (liothyronine) is believed to be safe for use in breastfeeding women. This eMedTV article provides more information about Cytomel and breastfeeding, and explains how untreated hypothyroidism can cause lactation problems in a woman.
  • Cytomel and Pregnancy
    Cytomel (liothyronine) is one of the few drugs considered to be safe for use in pregnant women. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on Cytomel and pregnancy, and discusses the dangers of untreated hypothyroidism during pregnancy.
  • Cytomel Dosage
    For most cases of mild hypothyroidism, the recommended starting Cytomel dosage is 25 mcg once daily. This eMedTV segment also provides Cytomel dosing guidelines for the treatment of goiters, myxedema, and congenital hypothyroidism in infants.
  • Cytomel Interactions
    Medications that may cause Cytomel interactions include warfarin, digoxin, and estrogens. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists other products that may interact with Cytomel and explains what may happen when these drugs are taken together.
  • Cytomel Medication Information
    This eMedTV page provides some basic information on Cytomel, a medication used to treat people with an underactive thyroid. It describes how this drug works and how it compares to other products, along with cases when this medicine may need to be avoided.
  • Cytomel Overdose
    A Cytomel (liothyronine) overdose can be dangerous and may cause seizures, stroke, or coma. This eMedTV segment lists some of the less dangerous symptoms of an overdose on Cytomel and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Cytomel Side Effects
    Potential Cytomel side effects include diarrhea, shakiness, and increased appetite. This eMedTV resource provides a list of other possible side effects of Cytomel and describes common signs of an allergic reaction, which could occur with this drug.
  • Cytomel Uses
    Cytomel uses are concerned with treating hypothyroidism and goiters. This article from the eMedTV library discusses in more detail what Cytomel is used for, explains how the drug works, and lists possible off-label uses for the medicine.
  • Cytomel Warnings and Precautions
    Cytomel can make heart problems worse and should not be used to lose weight. This eMedTV page lists other side effects or problems that may occur with Cytomel. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this thyroid medication are also included.
  • Cytomil
    Cytomel is a prescription medicine licensed to treat hypothyroidism and goiters. This part of the eMedTV archives explores other Cytomel uses and describes the medication in more detail. Cytomil is a common misspelling of Cytomel.
  • Diagnosing Acromegaly
    To make an acromegaly diagnosis, the doctor uses information from the patient's medical history, physical exam, blood tests, glucose tolerance test, and MRI or CT scan. This eMedTV article explains the process of diagnosing acromegaly in detail.
  • Diagnosing Addison's Disease
    A diagnosis of Addison's disease is typically made through laboratory tests. This eMedTV page describes the process of diagnosing Addison's disease, which often includes asking questions and performing a physical exam.
  • Diagnosing Adrenal Insufficiency
    Diagnosing adrenal insufficiency often requires specific lab tests to measure cortisol levels. This eMedTV resource outlines the process doctors use to diagnose adrenal insufficiency.
  • Diagnosing Hyperthyroidism
    As explained in this eMedTV page, diagnosing hyperthyroidism involves the use of tests that look at certain hormone levels in the blood. This article takes a closer look at how your healthcare provider will diagnose an overactive thyroid.
  • Diagnosing Hypothyroidism
    Symptoms alone are not enough to make a hypothyroidism diagnosis, so healthcare providers use certain tests. This eMedTV article describes these tests for hypothyroidism in detail, explaining what they check and what the readings mean.
  • Diagnosing Pituitary Tumors
    Diagnosing pituitary tumors usually involves blood tests to measure the levels of hormones in the blood. This eMedTV Web page explains how a pituitary tumor diagnosis is made, including information about tests and procedures involved in the process.
  • Diagnosing Prolactinoma
    A doctor diagnosing prolactinoma will often order tests such as an MRI and blood tests. This eMedTV resource describes the process used to make a prolactinoma diagnosis, which often begins with a review of the patient's medical history and symptoms.
  • Diet for a Low Thyroid
    Although there is no diet to treat a low thyroid, it is important to follow an eating plan that is balanced. This eMedTV Web article offers a few tips for healthy eating and explains why some foods should not be combined with thyroid medication.
  • Drug Interactions With Acarbose
    Estrogens and certain decongestants are among the drugs that can potentially interact with acarbose. This eMedTV Web page explains how drug interactions with acarbose can raise your risk of high or low blood sugar, among other things.
  • Drug Interactions With Alogliptin
    As this eMedTV segment explains, there are potential interactions with alogliptin and other drugs, such as insulin, sulfonylureas, and meglitinides. This page covers the potential results of these combinations and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Alogliptin and Metformin
    Because so many drugs can interact with alogliptin and metformin, this eMedTV page lists many of them and stresses the importance of telling your doctor about any other medicines you are taking. This page also describes the problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Alogliptin and Pioglitazone
    Insulin, sulfonylureas, and many other drugs can cause interactions with alogliptin and pioglitazone. This eMedTV segment outlines other products that may cause problems with alogliptin and pioglitazone, and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Canagliflozin
    As this eMedTV resource explains, interactions with canagliflozin and other drugs, such as insulin and blood pressure medications, are possible. This article covers the problems that can occur and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Exenatide
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, there are potential drug interactions with exenatide and other medicines, such as acetaminophen, antibiotics, and oral contraceptives. This page explains how these interactions can potentially lead to problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Extended-Release Exenatide
    It may not be safe to use extended-release exenatide with insulin, Byetta, or sulfonylureas. This eMedTV page describes the potential effects of these drug interactions with extended-release exenatide and what your doctor may do to prevent such problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Glimepiride
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, drug interactions with glimepiride can occur when glimepiride is taken with other medications, such as certain seizure medications, decongestants, diuretics, or oral contraceptives.
  • Drug Interactions With Glipizide and Metformin
    As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions with glipizide and metformin are possible when it is taken with other drugs, such as beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, and estrogen. This page also explains the problems that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With GlucaGen
    As explained in this portion of the eMedTV site, GlucaGen has the potential to interact with beta blockers and, when used in high doses, warfarin. This article describes the potential effects of drug interactions with this injectable medication.
  • Drug Interactions With Glucophage
    As this eMedTV Web page describes, there are potential drug interactions with Glucophage and other medications, such as diuretics, thyroid medicines, and oral contraceptives. This page explains how these interactions can lead to problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Glucotrol
    This eMedTV Web page describes the potential drug interactions with Glucotrol that can occur when it is taken with other medicines, such as thyroid medications, estrogens, and decongestants. The problems these interactions can cause are also listed.
  • Drug Interactions With Glyburide and Metformin
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are potential drug interactions with glyburide and metformin and other drugs (including thyroid medications, oral contraceptives, and niacin). This page explains how these drug interactions can lead to problems.
  • Drug Interactions With Inhaled Insulin
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, there are potential drug interactions with inhaled insulin and other medicines, such as thyroid medications, diuretics, and oral contraceptives. This page also explains the problems these interactions can lead to.
  • Drug Interactions With Insulin Aspart
    Octreotide, propoxyphene, and MAOIs are medicines that may cause drug interactions with insulin aspart. This eMedTV segment describes the potentially dangerous effects of insulin aspart interactions and lists other drugs that may cause an interaction.
  • Drug Interactions With Insulin Detemir
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, ACE inhibitors, alcohol, and MAOIs are some of the substances that may negatively interact with insulin detemir. This page also describes the problems these drug interactions with insulin detemir can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Insulin Glargine
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are potential drug interactions with insulin glargine and other medicines, such as oral diabetes medications, ACE inhibitors, and certain antibiotics. This page describes the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Insulin Glulisine
    This eMedTV page explains why you should talk to your doctor about all medicines you are taking before starting insulin glulisine to avoid possible drug interactions. With insulin glulisine, interactions can occur with MAOIs, among other things.
  • Drug Interactions With Insulin Lispro
    Alcoholic beverages, salicylates, and beta blockers may cause drug interactions with insulin lispro. This eMedTV page explains what can happen if these are combined with insulin lispro and lists other drugs that may cause a negative interaction.
  • Drug Interactions With Insulin Lispro Protamine/Insulin Lispro
    Reserpine, fibrates, and MAOIs may cause drug interactions with insulin lispro protamine/insulin lispro. As this eMedTV article explains, insulin lispro protamine/insulin lispro drug interactions can result in dangerously low blood sugar levels.
  • Drug Interactions With Levothyroxine
    Medicines that can negatively interact with levothyroxine include antacids, digoxin, and antidepressants. This eMedTV Web page includes a more complete list of medicines that can cause levothyroxine drug interactions and describes the possible effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Linagliptin
    This eMedTV Web page explains that when certain products, such as trazodone, rifampin, or glipizide, are taken with linagliptin, drug interactions can occur. This page also describes the problems these reactions may cause and how to minimize your risk.
  • Drug Interactions With Linagliptin/Metformin
    Your healthcare provider may recommend you not combine certain products with linagliptin/metformin. This eMedTV segment looks at some of the drugs and other substances that can cause interactions with linagliptin/metformin and the problems may result.
  • Drug Interactions With Liraglutide
    Amaryl, Starlix, insulin, and several other drugs can interact with liraglutide. This eMedTV segment describes these interactions in detail, explaining the possible results of these reactions and why some people need extra monitoring during treatment.
  • Drug Interactions With Methimazole
    As this eMedTV page points out, methimazole can interact with several drugs, including Lopressor, Digitek, and Coumadin. This article discusses other medications that can interfere with the antithyroid drug and lists some of the problems that may result.
  • Drug Interactions With Metoclopramide
    Seizure medications, narcotics, and antipsychotics may cause drug interactions with metoclopramide. This eMedTV article lists other medicines that may interact with metoclopramide and describes the problems that may develop if an interaction occurs.
  • Drug Interactions With Nateglinide
    This eMedTV page describes the potential drug interactions with nateglinide that can occur when it is taken with other medicines, such as thyroid medications, beta blockers, and MAOIs. This page also lists the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With NPH Insulin/Regular Insulin
    Reserpine, salicylates, and MAOIs may cause serious drug interactions with NPH insulin/regular insulin. As this eMedTV page explains, these interactions can increase the risk of low blood sugar, which quickly can become dangerous, possibly even fatal.
  • Drug Interactions With Pioglitazone
    As this eMedTV article explains, Norvir, Adalat, and Versed are some of the drugs that may cause drug interactions with pioglitazone. This Web page discusses these and other medicines that can cause pioglitazone interactions.
  • Drug Interactions With Pioglitazone and Glimepiride
    Drugs such as niacin, diuretics, or warfarin may cause drug interactions with pioglitazone and glimepiride. This eMedTV article lists other medicines that can lead to drug interactions and describes the potential side effects that may occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Pioglitazone and Metformin
    Cimetidine, niacin, and rifampin may potentially cause drug interactions with pioglitazone and metformin. This eMedTV article lists other medicines that can cause pioglitazone and metformin interactions and describes the possible effects.
  • Drug Interactions With Pramlintide
    Drug interactions with pramlintide may occur when the medication is taken with medicines such as Precose. This eMedTV Web page discusses other medications that may interact with pramlintide, such as anticholinergic medications.
  • Drug Interactions With Regular Insulin
    Beta blockers, fibrates, and ACE inhibitors may cause drug interactions with regular insulin. As this eMedTV page explains, regular insulin interactions can result in dangerously low blood sugar levels (which can become quite dangerous very quickly).
  • Drug Interactions With Repaglinide
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, there are drug interactions with repaglinide and other medicines to be aware of, such as certain antibiotics, protease inhibitors, and MAOIs. This page also explains the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Drug Interactions With Repaglinide and Metformin
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, certain medications can cause negative drug interactions with repaglinide and metformin. This page lists the medicines that may interact with repaglinide and metformin, and describes the complications that can occur.
  • Drug Interactions With Rosiglitazone
    As this eMedTV page points out, there are potential drug interactions with rosiglitazone and other medicines, such as Lopid and rifampin. This article explains how these interactions can change the amount of rosiglitazone in your blood.
  • Drug Interactions With Rosiglitazone and Glimepiride
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are potential drug interactions with rosiglitazone and glimepiride and other drugs, such as thyroid medications, oral contraceptives, and niacin. This page explains how these drug interactions can lead to problems.
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