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Living With Adrenal Insufficiency - Pioglitazone and Metformin (Actoplus Met)

This page contains links to eMedTV Endocrine System Articles containing information on subjects from Living With Adrenal Insufficiency to Pioglitazone and Metformin (Actoplus Met). The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Living With Adrenal Insufficiency
    Living with adrenal insufficiency may often be frustrating because treatment for the illness usually lasts a lifetime. This eMedTV segment offers tips and suggestions on how to make living with adrenal insufficiency easier.
  • Low Thyroid
    Hypothyroidism is a condition characterized by low levels of thyroid hormones. This page from the eMedTV archives provides a brief overview of this disorder, with a look at possible symptoms, diagnostic tests, and the usual treatment.
  • Low Thyroid Symptoms
    Not everyone has symptoms of low thyroid levels, and treatment may not be necessary until signs do appear. This eMedTV article lists a few signs of hypothyroidism, briefly explains how the condition is diagnosed, and includes a link to more information.
  • Medical Conditions and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV resource explains, certain medical conditions can increase your chances of pregnancy complications. However, there are things you can do to reduce your risk. This article takes a closer look.
  • Medication for Hyperthyroidism
    Antithyroid drugs and beta blockers are the most commonly used hyperthyroidism medications. This eMedTV selection talks about the medicines that are used to treat an overactive thyroid and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Metaclopramid
    Metoclopramide is often used for the treatment of GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV resource explores the drug's effects and lists side effects that may occur. Metaclopramid is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Metaclopramide
    Metoclopramide, a prescription drug, is approved to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV segment explains how metoclopramide works and lists some of its potential side effects. Metaclopramide is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Metaclopromide
    The medication metoclopramide is approved for the treatment of diabetic gastroparesis and GERD. This eMedTV page describes various forms of metoclopramide and covers other uses for the drug. Metaclopromide is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Methimazole
    A drug that is available only by prescription, methimazole is used to treat an overactive thyroid. This eMedTV segment gives an in-depth overview of this antithyroid medication, explaining its side effects, when and how to take it, and more.
  • Methimazole and Breastfeeding
    If you are breastfeeding, your healthcare provider may or may not prescribe you methimazole. This eMedTV page explains why the drug's prescribing information says not to take it while breastfeeding -- and why your doctor may prescribe it anyway.
  • Methimazole and Pregnancy
    Methimazole (Tapazole) crosses the placenta and is classified as a pregnancy Category D medication. This eMedTV selection discusses the safety of taking this product during pregnancy. This article also looks at another drug that may be more suitable.
  • Methimazole Dosage
    Once your hyperthyroidism is under control, your healthcare provider may lower your methimazole dosage. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at the dosing guidelines for this medication, with helpful tips on when and how to take your dose.
  • Methimazole Medication Information
    Methimazole is a drug used to treat hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid). This article from the eMedTV archives offers more information on methimazole, explaining how the medication is taken and including some possible side effects.
  • Methimazole Overdose
    Nerve problems, vomiting, and peeling of the skin are among the symptoms of a methimazole overdose. This eMedTV Web resource tells you more about potential overdose symptoms, as well as how the condition is typically treated.
  • Methimizole
    A prescription drug, methimazole is used to lower levels of thyroid hormone in people with hyperthyroidism. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more details. Methimizole is a common misspelling of methimazole.
  • Metoclopram
    Metoclopramide is a prescription medicine used to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of metoclopramide and lists its potential side effects. Metoclopram is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Metoclopramida
    The prescription drug metoclopramide is used for treating GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV article explains how metoclopramide works and lists warnings and precautions for the drug. Metoclopramida is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Metoclopramide
    Metoclopramide is a medication approved for the short-term treatment of GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at metoclopramide and its effects, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Metoclopramide Dosage
    The recommended metoclopramide dosage for people being treated for GERD is 10 or 15 mg four times daily. This eMedTV Web page also provides metoclopramide dosing guidelines for the treatment of diabetic gastroparesis.
  • Metoclopramide HCl Drug Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, metoclopramide hydrochloride (HCl) is used to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This page offers more information on metoclopramide, including what to discuss with your doctor before taking this drug.
  • Metoclopramide Side Effects
    Potential side effects of metoclopramide include diarrhea, fatigue, and frequent urination. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists other potential metoclopramide side effects, including serious ones that require immediate medical attention.
  • Metoclopramine
    People with GERD or diabetic gastroparesis may benefit from a medication called metoclopramide. This eMedTV page explains how often metoclopramide is taken and describes the drug's effects. Metoclopramine is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Metocloprimide
    GERD and diabetic gastroparesis are conditions that can be treated with metoclopramide. This eMedTV page covers other metoclopramide uses and explains how the drug works for these conditions. Metocloprimide is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Metoclopromide
    Metoclopramide is used for treating diabetic gastroparesis and GERD. This eMedTV page describes how metoclopramide works and explains what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Metoclopromide is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Metoclorpramide
    In order to reduce symptoms of GERD, your healthcare provider may prescribe metoclopramide. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works and lists side effects that may occur. Metoclorpramide is a common misspelling of metoclopramide.
  • Nateglinide
    Nateglinide is often prescribed to lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works to increase insulin production, lists possible side effects, offers tips on taking the medication, and more.
  • Nateglinide Dosing
    As this eMedTV page explains, the starting dose of nateglinide is generally 120 mg, taken before each meal. However, the nateglinide dosing amount may be lower based on certain blood sugar tests. This page also offers some tips on taking the drug.
  • Nateglinide for Diabetes
    One of the medications used to treat type 2 diabetes is nateglinide. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes a quick look at how this prescription drug is used and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Nateglinide Side Effects
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site lists both common and serious nateglinide side effects to be aware of, including dizziness, joint problems, and low blood sugar. This article also explains what to do should any of these side effects occur.
  • Novolin N
    Novolin N is non-prescription insulin used for controlling blood sugar in people with diabetes. This eMedTV resource describes how Novolin N works, explains when and how to administer the drug, and lists possible side effects of the medication.
  • Novolin N and Breastfeeding
    Most doctors consider Novolin N (NPH insulin) to be safe for breastfeeding women and their infants. This eMedTV page offers information on Novolin N and breastfeeding, and explains whether the drug could cause problems if passed through breast milk.
  • Novolin N and Pregnancy
    Novolin N (NPH insulin) is generally considered to be safe for use during pregnancy. This page on the eMedTV site provides more information on Novolin N and pregnancy, and explains why it is important to control blood sugar levels during pregnancy.
  • Novolin N Dosage
    There is no set Novolin N dosage that will work for all people or even the same person in all situations. This eMedTV segment provides Novolin N dosing precautions and tips, including general directions on how to use this form of insulin.
  • Novolin N Drug Interactions
    If reserpine, MAOIs, or sulfa drugs are taken with Novolin N, drug interactions could occur. This eMedTV Web page lists other medicines that may interact with this form of insulin and describes the potential effects of Novolin N interactions.
  • Novolin N Insulin
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Novolin N is an intermediate-acting insulin used in people with diabetes. This Web page takes a closer look at this drug, with helpful information on how to use it. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Novolin N Insulin Information
    An intermediate-acting form of insulin, Novolin N is approved for the treatment of diabetes. This eMedTV page offers more information on Novolin N, with details on how it is given and what to expect. A link to more details is also included.
  • Novolin N Overdose
    A Novolin N overdose could cause dizziness or blurry vision, which are signs of low blood sugar. This eMedTV resource explores the potential dangers of a Novolin N (NPH insulin) overdose and lists other warnings signs of low blood sugar.
  • Novolin N Side Effects
    Injection site skin reactions and changes in blood sugar levels are potential side effects of Novolin N. This eMedTV page covers Novolin N side effects, including some of the warnings signs of low blood sugar, one of the most serious side effects.
  • Novolin N Uses
    Novolin N is used for controlling blood sugar levels throughout the day in people with diabetes. This eMedTV page describes how the insulin works, explains whether there are any off-label Novolin N uses, and discusses the use of this drug in children.
  • Novolin N Warnings and Precautions
    Novolin N could cause dangerously low blood sugar levels. This eMedTV article includes a list of other potential side effects of Novolin N. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this form of insulin are also included on this page.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30
    NovoLog Mix 70/30 is a medication approved to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This eMedTV page describes how this medication works; lists possible side effects that can occur; and explains how, when, and where to inject the insulin.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30 and Breastfeeding
    NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine/insulin aspart) is probably safe for breastfeeding women. This eMedTV page includes more information on NovoLog Mix 70/30 and breastfeeding, and explains why the drug is unlikely to be dangerous.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30 and Pregnancy
    NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine/insulin aspart) may not be safe for pregnant women. This eMedTV article offers more information on NovoLog Mix 70/30 and pregnancy, and explains whether the drug is likely to cause problems in a fetus.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30 Dosage
    The carbohydrate content of your meals is an important factor in determining your NovoLog Mix 70/30 dosage. This eMedTV segment provides general NovoLog Mix 70/30 dosing guidelines and offers tips and precautions for taking the medication.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30 Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause NovoLog Mix 70/30 drug interactions include reserpine, MAOIs, and beta blockers. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that may interact with NovoLog Mix 70/30 and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30 Overdose
    A NovoLog Mix 70/30 (insulin aspart protamine/insulin aspart) overdose can cause low blood sugar levels. This eMedTV resource lists symptoms of low blood sugar and explains what treatment options are available for a NovoLog Mix 70/30 overdose.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30 Side Effects
    Low blood sugar and an allergic reaction are potentially serious NovoLog Mix 70/30 side effects. This eMedTV resource lists warnings signs of these serious side effects and describes other possible side effects of NovoLog Mix 70/30.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30 Uses
    NovoLog Mix 70/30 is used for controlling blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This eMedTV page describes how this form of insulin works, lists possible off-label NovoLog Mix 70/30 uses, and explains whether the drug is approved for children.
  • NovoLog Mix 70/30 Warnings and Precautions
    Before using NovoLog Mix 70/30, warnings and precautions for the drug should be reviewed with your doctor. This eMedTV article explains what to be aware of before using the drug and lists possible side effects that may occur with treatment.
  • NPH Insulin/Regular Insulin
    NPH insulin/regular insulin is a non-prescription medicine used for treating diabetes. This page on the eMedTV site explains how this form of insulin works, lists some of its potential side effects, and offers information on how to inject the drug.
  • NPH Insulin/Regular Insulin Dosage
    The dosage for NPH insulin/regular insulin is tailored for each individual person. This eMedTV resource provides general dosing guidelines for this medication and offers information on how to properly inject NPH insulin/regular insulin.
  • NPH Insulin/Regular Insulin Information
    This eMedTV article contains information on NPH insulin/regular insulin, a combination drug used to treat diabetes. This resource explores side effects, basic dosing guidelines, and more. Also included is a link to more in-depth information.
  • Pioglitazone
    Pioglitazone is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat type 2 diabetes. This part of the eMedTV library describes how pioglitazone works to control blood sugar, offers dosing tips, and lists possible side effects of the medicine.
  • Pioglitazone and Glimepiride
    Pioglitazone and glimepiride is licensed to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. This eMedTV article further describes this prescription drug and offers detailed information on how it works, its effects, possible side effects, and more.
  • Pioglitazone and Glimepiride Dosing
    Pioglitazone and glimepiride dosing guidelines when first starting the drug call for 30 mg/2 mg a day. This eMedTV page also offers dosage recommendations for those who are switching from other medications to this combination drug.
  • Pioglitazone and Glimepiride Info
    Type 2 diabetes may be treated with a combination medication called pioglitazone and glimepiride. This eMedTV selection provides some basic info on pioglitazone and glimepiride, such as how it works and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Pioglitazone and Metformin
    Pioglitazone and metformin is a combination drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page describes the medication in more detail and offers information on its effects, dosing, available strengths, and possible side effects.
  • Pioglitazone and Metformin (Actoplus Met)
    This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of pioglitazone and metformin (Actoplus Met), with details on what type of diabetes it can treat, how many times a day it is taken, and more. Also included is a link to more information.
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